fountain

St. Georgs-Fountain

St. George is the symbol of bravery and represents the early Christian chivalric martyr.

Laurent Perroud created here in 1548 an artistic arrangement of three figures in a very confined space. Standing tall on horseback, St. George is the symbol of bravery and represents the early Christian chivalric martyr. He is surrounded by the fire-breathing dragon and the king's daughter. The fluted and turned column shaft bears a projecting capital with angels playing music.

According to a legend, a dragon received two sheep a day from the threatened population of the city of Silene. When the number of sheep was no longer sufficient, a sheep and a child were sacrificed until the king also had to hand over his own daughter to the monster. George chased, fought and defeated the dragon.

The fountain figures were originally intended for the Gurzelngasse, where they stood until 1780. The stick and the trough are from the same year. The water leakage of the fountain basins, originally made of stone slabs, was solved by the people of Solothurn in the course of the 18th century. Jura limestone fountain troughs from the stone pits north of the city. In accordance with the fashion of the time, they decorated them with Louis XVI motifs.

The stock exchange square once served as a place of grain trade, but also as a transhipment point for geese and other poultry. Our fragrant little alley was called "Gansgässli" and the fountain "Gänsbrunnen". In 1769 it was called "Feyeleingässli" for the first time. Presumably this was a joke on the stench of geese and chickens.

City tour

Each of the 11 fountains in the city has its own history. The figures served to educate the people. Learn more about the strict rules of water supply in old Solothurn on the fountain tour. A fountain tour is a great idea. Book right here.

Good to know

  • The 11 fountains and their history can also be discovered on an individual tour of Solothurn's old town.